Oticon Opn™ Helps People with Hearing Loss Hear Better, with Less Effort and Better Recall

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First-ever Hearing Aid to Connect to the Internet Now Available at Anderson Audiology: a Division of North Hills ENT
Tarrant County, TX – May 31, 2016 – The Audiologists of Anderson Audiology: a division of North Hills ENT in Tarrant County recently joined more than 1,300 leading hearing care professionals at a professional conference in Orlando that introduced Oticon Opn™, a revolutionary new hearing aid with BrainHearing™ technology. With new Opn, people with hearing loss not only hear better with less effort and remember more of what is said. Opn expertly manages multiple speech and noise sources so people don’t have to work as hard to understand speech, even in challenging listening situations like restaurants or social gatherings.
“Oticon Opn, the first hearing aid proven to make it easier on the brain,” said Dr. Horan. “Preliminary testing shows that Opn increases speech understanding, the parameter most important to hearing aid wearers, by 30%.* People who wear Opn also experience 20% less listening effort when trying to understand speech. * And because they use up less energy trying to understand, they are able to remember 20% more of what was said.”**
The small, discreet hearing aid is a powerhouse of innovative technology. Opn is powered by the high speed Velox™ platform – 50 times faster than previous technology – that scans, analyzes and reacts to sounds in the environments more than 100 times per second. Opn allows wearers to enjoy an open sound experience where surrounding sounds are available but not intrusive. They can easily follow the sounds they want to hear and quickly shift their attention when desired.
Opn offers easy wireless connectivity to a variety of smartphones and other iOS and Android devices. Audio is streamed directly to the hearing aids using Bluetooth technology developed especially for hearing aids that uses significantly less battery power when streaming. With the free, downloadable Oticon ON App™, wearers can control volume, program or device selection, and other functions with just a tap of their smartphone.
Oticon Opn is the world’s first hearing aid that connects directly to the internet via the If This Then That network (IFTTF.com). “Wearers can connect to a range of IFTTT-enabled devices used in everyday life such as door bells, thermostats and baby monitors,” said Dr. McDonald . “And people will be able to use their Opn hearing aids with a growing number of IFTTT-compatible products and services as they become available.”
To make an appointment to have your hearing tested or to discuss whether the Oticon Opn is right for you, call Anderson Audiology at 817-282-8402 or learn more here www.AndersonAudiologyDFW.com.
For more information on Oticon Opn, visit www.oticon.com.

Contact:

North Hills ENT and Anderson Audiology have several convenient locations to try the new Oticon technology!

North Hills ENT – 817-595-3700
4351 Booth Calloway Road, Ste. 308
North Richland Hills, TX  76180

North Hills ENT– 817-595-3700
647 S. Great Southwest Pkwy., Ste. 103
Grand Prairie, TX  75051

www.NorthHillsENT.com

Anderson Audiology – 817-282-8402
1550 Norwood Drive, Suite 100
Hurst, TX  76054

www.AndersonAudiologyDFW.com

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*Compared to Alta2 Pro
**Individual benefit may vary depending on instrument prescription

Stuttering

Stuttering is defined as disruptions of speech sounds or “disfluencies” that affects the fluency of conversational speech. This typically begins in childhood but can last for a lifetime depending on familial history, age of onset, and severity.

There is no, one cause of stuttering; rather, a combination of four factors are considered the cause. These factors include genetics (according to the National Stuttering Foundation website, approximately 60% of people who stutter [PWS] also have a family member that does so), child development (developmental delays or sound production disorders), neurophysiology (recent studies have demonstrated that PWS process language differently than those who are typically fluent), and environmental factors (family dynamics).

According to the American Speech and Hearing Association, stuttering includes repetitions of whole words, part words, and speech sounds that occur more in persons who stutter (PWS) than others. Other behaviors include speech being stopped or “blocked” with an open mouth posture with little to no speech coming out as well as sounds in words being prolonged. Some examples include:

·         Sound Repetition o   “t-t-t-t-t-t-to the store”
·         Part-Word Repetition o   “ma-ma-ma-ma-make it go”
·         Whole-Word Repetition o   “my-my-my-my dog is big”
·         Block o   “____________THE cookie is mine”
·         Prolongation o   “sssssssss-it next to me”
·         Interjection o   “I, um-um-um like um-um ponies”

 

Typical disfluencies include whole-word repetitions (“the the ball is red”) or part-word repetitions that occur once or twice (“li-li-like my dress?”); typical disfluencies can also include interjections and filler words. These disfluencies typically occur between 1.5 and 5 years and have a tendency to ebb and flow in a child’s speech. This is thought to be due to large language gains that occur sporadically throughout a child’s development w hich cause difficulty with organization of vocabulary and associated categories or attributes, as well as word-finding difficulties.

Children who are thought to exhibit a mild stutter will repeat sounds more than twice and will have tension or “struggles” that are visible in their face and body. Additionally, some children exhibit a pitch rise during stuttered moments as well as “prolongations” (“mmmmmmmmmmmmm-y mommy makes sandwichessssssssss”) and “blocks” (“____________THE puppy is big”.

Severe stuttering is characterized by the examples provided above in addition to physical characteristics. These include obvious tension in the face and mouth (facial contortions), shoulders and neck as well as physical movements (head bobbing, hand movements, leg movements, table tapping, etc.). Additionally, prolongations and blocks noted in PWS’s speech are noted to be longer and increasingly severe in nature.

Treatment is dependent on a child’s age, awareness of the disfluencies, as well as additional concomitant diagnoses. Most treatment centers on changing the patient’s behaviors to improve communication; for example, making sentences shorter and less complex as well as slowing the rate of speech by using a reduced speed or pausing/chunking their words between slow and easy breaths. Additionally, strategies and techniques can be taught to older children to improve their speech during and prior to a stuttering moment.

Source: (Stuttering. (n.d.). Retrieved October 20, 2015, from http://www.asha.org/public/speech/disorders/stuttering.htm), (If You Think Your Child Is Stuttering… (n.d.). Retrieved October 20, 2015, from http://www.stutteringhelp.org/if-you-think-your-child-stuttering)

 

North Hills ENT and Anderson Audiology have several convenient locations for Speech Therapy!

North Hills ENT – 817-595-3700
4351 Booth Calloway Road, Ste. 308
North Richland Hills, TX  76180

North Hills ENT– 817-595-3700
647 S. Great Southwest Pkwy., Ste. 103
Grand Prairie, TX  75051

www.NorthHillsENT.com

Anderson Audiology – 817-282-8402
1550 Norwood Drive, Suite 100
Hurst, TX  76054

www.AndersonAudiologyDFW.com

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Speech Sound Disorders

Does your child continue to say words or sounds incorrectly? Are they not “growing out of it?” It may be a good idea to have them evaluated by a professional.

Speech sound disorders are mistakes that children make in their articulation or pronunciation of words past a certain developmental age. There are two types of disorders: Articulation disorders – making sounds and Phonological processes – sound patterns. Speech sound disorders can be a result of developmental disorders (autism), genetic syndromes (Down syndrome), hearing loss, illness, or neurological disorders (cerebral palsy).

Articulation disorders include errors with sound substitutions (“b” for a “v”- “tibi”/“TV”), sound deletion (“-ouse”/”house”), or sound addition (“blooduh”/”blood”). Sounds in our language are developed at different ages and some sound errors are considered appropriate at different times; this is why it is important to seek out evaluation from our certified pediatric speech-language pathologist to understand typical development and to know where your child falls with their intelligibility.

Phonological processes are patterns of sound errors or sound rules that are learned inappropriately rather than learning the proper rules during development. Patterns include substituting the “k” and “g” for the “t” and “d” (“tup”/”cup”, “do”/”go”), or a reduction of two consonants in a word (“tar”/”star”, “lock”/”clock”). These processes decrease by certain ages as well.

These disorders are diagnosed through a formal evaluation with standardized tests performed by a certified speech and language pathologist. Articulation and Phonological disorders are treated with a child-centered speech therapy program individualized to the patient’s needs in order to “improve articulation of individual sounds and reduce errors in production of sound patterns.” Parents are encouraged to be an active participant in their child’s therapy session as well as in their home-practice activities.

Make an appointment to see our pediatric speech-language pathologist today if you have any concerns about your child’s pronunciation or ability to be understood by family and friends!

Source: (American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (n.d.) Speech Sound Disorders: Articulation and Phonology. (Practice Portal). Retrieved October, 15, 2015, from www.asha.org/Practice-Portal/Clinical-Topics/Articulation-and-Phonology.)

 

North Hills ENT and Anderson Audiology have several convenient locations for Speech Therapy!

North Hills ENT – 817-595-3700
4351 Booth Calloway Road, Ste. 308
North Richland Hills, TX  76180

North Hills ENT– 817-595-3700
647 S. Great Southwest Pkwy., Ste. 103
Grand Prairie, TX  75051

www.NorthHillsENT.com

Anderson Audiology – 817-282-8402
1550 Norwood Drive, Suite 100
Hurst, TX  76054

www.AndersonAudiologyDFW.com

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Late Talkers or Late Language Emergence

Late language emergence, or “late talkers,” is a delay in the development and onset of language skills where there are no additional disabilities, motor deficiencies, or cognitive delays diagnosed. These children typically present with either a “mixed receptive and expressive language delay” or just an “expressive language delay.” An expressive language delay is usually characterized by a limited vocabulary and slowed articulation or sentence structure development while a “mixed” language delay typically presents with difficulty comprehending and producing language. If these diagnoses go untreated by a certified speech-language pathologist in speech therapy, it can result in development of language and literacy delays as the child ages and progresses through school. Additionally, it can be a sign of underlying disorders including but not limited to: specific language impairment, social communication disorder, autism spectrum disorder, learning disability, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, intellectual disability, etc.

Some signs and symptoms of a “late talker” include but are not limited to:

·         Child uses little to no words/word combinations  by age of 18 mos. to 2 years o   Points and grunts instead of labeling, commenting or requesting

o   Exhibits little to no 2-word sentences by 2 years old

·         Child demonstrates a limited vocabulary o   Children should exhibit a vocabulary between 5-20 words by 18 months, 150-300 words by 2 years, and 900-1000 words by 3 years
·         Child exhibits frustration/behavior difficulties when attempts at communication fail

 

o   Tantrums occur when he/she is not understood

o   Little to no attention to tasks and acting out from difficulty communicating

·         Not pointing to objects or pictures

 

o   Will not identify pictures of animals or objects when given a verbal prompt by 12 months
·         Not answering questions appropriately/repeating a question as the answer

 

o   “Do you want juice?”… “want juice?”

o   “What did you have for breakfast?”… “I eat”

o   “Where do you sleep?” … “Blanket”

·         Difficulty with following multi-step directions o   “Get the toy, and give it to me”

o   “Take off your shoes, put them away, then wash your hands”

·         Difficulty with understanding/using pronouns o   “I”, “me”, “you”, “my”, “mine”, “he”, “she”, “they”, “his”, “hers”, “him”, “her”
·         Difficulty with understanding/using simple prepositions o   “on”, “off”, “over”, “under”, “front”, “back”, “next to”
·         Difficulty with understanding/using verbs or action words o   “run”, “eat”, “jump”, “play”, “drink”, “sleep”, “wash”, etc.

 

If your child exhibits any of these “red flags”, please don’t hesitate to contact our Pediatric Speech Therapy Center to schedule a language evaluation today!

 

North Hills ENT and Anderson Audiology have several convenient locations for Speech Therapy!

North Hills ENT – 817-595-3700
4351 Booth Calloway Road, Ste. 308
North Richland Hills, TX  76180

North Hills ENT– 817-595-3700
647 S. Great Southwest Pkwy., Ste. 103
Grand Prairie, TX  75051

www.NorthHillsENT.com

Anderson Audiology – 817-282-8402
1550 Norwood Drive, Suite 100
Hurst, TX  76054

www.AndersonAudiologyDFW.com

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Home Practice for Speech Therapy

After each speech therapy session, your therapist will usually review the goals that were addressed as well as activities and strategies for you to try at home until the next therapy session. You might think, “I don’t have time for this!” or “I’m not the professional, what if I do it wrong?” When in reality, once you have been educated on the appropriate strategies and techniques specific to your child, YOU are one of their greatest assets to improving and generalizing their speech and language skills!

A typical speech therapy session lasts anywhere from 30 minutes/1 hour at a rate of 1-2 times a week. At the most, this is 2 whole hours a week of instruction from a professional who has the knowledge and experience to appropriately treat your child’s difficulty; at the least, it is 30 minutes a week! However, 2 hours a week is not a large amount of time in the grand scheme of the every day routine for your child. This also presents a difficulty in ensuring carryover as your child isn’t thinking about the techniques and strategies they have been taught except for in the therapy room. Here’s where you come in, parents! If therapy goals are targeted by you once a day for 5 minutes in the morning, and 5 minutes before bed, that is 70 extra minutes a week of practice they are exposed to; not to mention a consistent reminder of the areas they need to focus on throughout their day.

So, would you rather your child get 2 hours of practice a week, or over 3 hours a week in instruction?

Our pediatric speech therapist will typically discuss or send home paperwork detailing homework activities she wishes you to work on that are specific to your child. There are many ways to work with your child’s speech and language at home! Ask our pediatric speech therapist about ways to improve your child’s speech and language skills at home today.   817-595-3700

 

 

North Hills ENT and Anderson Audiology have several convenient locations for Speech Therapy!

North Hills ENT – 817-595-3700
4351 Booth Calloway Road, Ste. 308
North Richland Hills, TX  76180

North Hills ENT– 817-595-3700
647 S. Great Southwest Pkwy., Ste. 103
Grand Prairie, TX  75051

www.NorthHillsENT.com

Anderson Audiology – 817-282-8402
1550 Norwood Drive, Suite 100
Hurst, TX  76054

www.AndersonAudiologyDFW.com

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Auditory Verbal Therapy

Image courtesy of http://www.avuk.org/

Image courtesy of Auditory Verbal UK

According to the ASHA Leader Blog, “Auditory Verbal Therapy: Supporting Listening and Spoken Language in Young Children with Hearing Loss and Their Families,” 95% of parents of children with hearing loss are hearing (Mitchell & Karchmer, 2004), and many of these families wish to pursue a spoken language path for their children who exhibit hearing loss; rather than a modality that utilizes signs or gestures. This goal is attainable with early identification, appropriate amplification, and intervention approaches that focus on achieving typical development in listening, speech, language, cognition, and conversational competence. As technology for amplification improves and parents are presented with a myriad of options for their children’s communication modality, more families are electing to pursue this spoken language option through Auditory-Verbal therapy.

Auditory Verbal Therapy focuses on learning and developing language through listening the same way a child with typical hearing would do. The Alexander Graham Bell (AG Bell) Academy for Listening and Spoken Language (the governing body for Listening and Spoken Language Specialists) defines Auditory-Verbal therapy as follows:

Auditory-Verbal Therapy facilitates optimal acquisition of spoken language through listening by newborns, infants, toddlers, and young children who are deaf or hard of hearing. Auditory-Verbal Therapy promotes early diagnosis, one-on-one therapy, and state-of-the-art audiologic management and technology. Parents and caregivers actively participate in therapy. Through guidance, coaching, and demonstration, parents become the primary facilitators of their child’s spoken language development. Ultimately, parents and caregivers gain confidence that their child can have access to a full range of academic, social, and occupational choices. Auditory-Verbal Therapy must be conducted in adherence to the Principles LSLS of Auditory-Verbal Therapy.” (AG Bell Academy, 2012).

Auditory-Verbal therapy relies on ten principles to make up the basis of the intervention. These principles are outlined below:

  1. Promote early diagnosis of hearing loss in newborns, infants, toddlers, and young children, followed by immediate audiologic management and Auditory-Verbal Therapy;
  2. Recommend immediate assessment and use of appropriate, state-of-the-art hearing technology to obtain maximum benefits of auditory stimulation;
  3. Guide and coach parents to help their child use hearing as the primary sensory modality in developing spoken language;
  4. Guide and coach parents to become the primary facilitators of their child’s listening and spoken language development through active consistent participation in individualized Auditory-Verbal Therapy;
  5. Guide and coach parents to create environments that support listening for the acquisition of spoken language throughout the child’s daily activities;
  6. Guide and coach parents to help their child integrate listening and spoken language into all aspects of the child’s life;
  7. Guide and coach parents to use natural developmental patterns of audition, speech, language, cognition, and communication;
  8. Guide and coach parents to help their child self-monitor spoken language through listening;
  9. Administer ongoing formal and informal diagnostic assessments to develop individualized Auditory-Verbal treatment plans, to monitor progress, and to evaluate the effectiveness of the plans for the child and family; and
  10. Promote education in regular school with peers who have typical hearing and with appropriate services from early childhood onwards.

4/23/2001 - - TAMPA - - CAPTION INFO: DIGITAL IMAGES: (2) Auditory / Verbal Therapist Tina LeVasseur (cq / 30 yrs.old / left) covers her mouth so Louie Alvarez (cq / 6 yrs.old / right) can't read her lips. They were playing a game to help Louie form sentences. **** The Oscar-nominated documentary "Sound and Fury" will be shown Thursday at Tampa Theater. It deals with the controversy in the deaf world over cochlear implants, medical devices that help deafpeople hear. Some in deaf community say this is bad, that it robs deaf people of their identity and treats deafness as something to 'fix'. Implant supporters think it's a medical miracle. Suzanne Alvarez is one of them. She brings her deaf daughter, Louie, 6, to the Bolesta Center for verbal therapy. Louie had the implant 4 yrs ago. She's doing well. - - Times Photo by: Ken Helle - - Story By: Jeanne Malmgren - - SCANNED BY: kh - - RUN DATE: 4/26/2001

Times Photo by Ken Helle

Auditory-Verbal Therapy prognosis typically depends on the age at identification, parent involvement, and if there are any additional disorders or diagnosis that the child exhibits. Therapy can range from 1 year, to several years working with a Listening and Spoken Language Specialist (LSLS) to improve your child’s communication skills. Therapy is non-invasive and a fun experience as it is rarely about drill and rather, utilizes every day routines, social play, as well as songs and nursery rhymes to improve your child’s ability to listen, and learn through listening.

Parents are expected to participate in this therapy path, as they are ultimately their child’s greatest asset in improving their communication skills. Your LSLS will work with you closely in therapy as well as outside of the therapy room to ensure your comfort with improving your child’s skills as well as your appropriate implementation of learned strategies and techniques in therapy. It truly is a team effort, with your LSLS as the coach, and you and your child as the players with the goal being for your child to be able to participate in and thrive in a typical home or classroom environment through listening.

If you are interested in pursuing Auditory-Verbal therapy for your child with hearing loss, please don’t hesitate to contact the North Hills ENT-Speech Therapy Center to schedule your evaluation with our Speech-Language Pathologist today!    817-595-3700

(Houston, T. (2012, March 29). Auditory-Verbal Therapy: Supporting Listening and Spoken Language in Young Children with Hearing Loss & Their Families. Retrieved October 20, 2015, from http://blog.asha.org/2012/03/29/auditory-verbal-therapy-supporting-listening-and-spoken-language-in-young-children-with-hearing-loss-their-families/ )

 

 

North Hills ENT and Anderson Audiology have several convenient locations for Speech Therapy!

North Hills ENT – 817-595-3700
4351 Booth Calloway Road, Ste. 308
North Richland Hills, TX  76180

North Hills ENT– 817-595-3700
647 S. Great Southwest Pkwy., Ste. 103
Grand Prairie, TX  75051

www.NorthHillsENT.com

Anderson Audiology – 817-282-8402
1550 Norwood Drive, Suite 100
Hurst, TX  76054

www.AndersonAudiologyDFW.com

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Autism and Speech Therapy

Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder that presents with delayed or disordered social communication skills and social interaction skills. A diagnosis of Autism is often regarded with negative emotions and diminished outlooks for the future. However, there are now many treatment options and modalities that improves the lives of children and families affected by this diagnosis. Early identification and intervention have shown to improve a child’s ability to function in every day social interactions and communication exchanges.

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Let’s review the early signs and red flags of ASD to watch for. These can be observed as young as 18 months; however, the highest incidence of red flags observed typically occur between 24 months and 6 years.

Social Communication – Child exhibits limited joint attention/play with others, exhibits limited eye-contact and social reciprocity, does not initiate/respond to interaction attempts, and/or demonstrates difficulty with conversational turn-taking.

Social Cognition – Child doesn’t understand feelings and/or empathize with others

Language and Cognition Skills

  1. Child has impaired speech and language skill development including limited vocabulary or losing words previously acquired. Child may also exhibit “echolalia” which is repetition of words/sounds he or she just heard or heard weeks ago. Child may also exhibit this by repeating movie scripts or book scripts out of context.
  2. Child may also have impaired understanding of non-verbal and verbal communication which may be apparent in their facial expressions, body language, and gestures. They may have executive function difficulty such as poor problem solving and poor planning or organizationl skills.
  3. Child exhibiting limited communication intent – does not attempt to communicate his/her wants or needs

Behavioral and Emotional Regulation – child may exhibit difficulty transitioning from one activity to another, may have tantrums when they are not understood, may have restricted areas of interest, and may have restricted and repetitive behaviors/patterns such as lining up toys or animals or stacking blocks continuously. Child may also utilize self-stimulating behaviors in order to calm down or wind up such as hand flapping, rocking, spinning, or covering their eyes/ears with their hands when they feel overwhelmed.

Sensory and Feeding – Child may have preferences for patterns of foods or rejections of patterns of foods based upon texture. For example, they may never eat “soft” foods and prefer to only eat “crunchy” foods, or they won’t touch mashed potatoes but will eat potato chips at every meal. They may be over-sensitive or under-sensitive to environmental sounds, light, visual clutter, and social stimuli such as social touch, proximity to others, and voices.

Speech therapy can help to improve these areas in children with ASD as the scope of practice for speech therapy addresses all five of these deficits. There is also a wide variety of therapy options and treatment modalities within speech therapy for children with Autism. Therapy is specific to each individual, as Autism is a spectrum and no two children are the same, and considers what is functional for the families and their involvement abilities. Ask about speech therapy for children with Autism at your North Hills-ENT location today!

Source – (American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (n.d.). Autism (Practice Portal). Retrieved October, 15, 2015, from www.asha.org/Practice-Portal/Clinical-Topics/Autism/).

 

North Hills ENT and Anderson Audiology have several convenient locations for Speech Therapy!

North Hills ENT – 817-595-3700
4351 Booth Calloway Road, Ste. 308
North Richland Hills, TX  76180

North Hills ENT– 817-595-3700
647 S. Great Southwest Pkwy., Ste. 103
Grand Prairie, TX  75051

www.NorthHillsENT.com

Anderson Audiology – 817-282-8402
1550 Norwood Drive, Suite 100
Hurst, TX  76054

www.AndersonAudiologyDFW.com

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